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Morning Joe

News/Business. Interviews with newsmakers and politicians; host Joe Scarborough. New.

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Us 22, Eliot Spitzer 18, Bulger 12, Kevin 12, Sarah Palin 11, Washington 11, New York 11, Whitey Bulger 10, Spitzer 9, Angie 9, Usaa 9, America 9, San Francisco 8, Boehner 7, Asiana 7, Hernandez 7, Scott Stringer 7, George W. Bush 7, New York City 7, U.s. 7,
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  MSNBC    Morning Joe    News/Business. Interviews with newsmakers  
   and politicians; host Joe Scarborough. New.  

    July 10, 2013
    3:00 - 6:00am PDT  

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so we asked the worst baby names legitimate ones. john tower has a few answers. >> we got ta holmes a student named erotica. and marglet, crisscross are all kids i wept to school with. >> that can't be real. >> a slew of them, check out #waytoobrutal. >> sales call today with customer named tiny person. after they hear this hopefully they won't cancel that sales call. time for "morning joe."
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we put together a segment for you folks. hope you enjoy it and find it entertaining and informational. a few moments with new york city comptroller eliot spitzer. take it away, eliot. ♪ >> huge, enormous, massive, nuts, bigger, bigger, too big, thrust, it goes deeper than a that, a stick is a rhinoceros. i think he's on to something. >> is that how we're starting the show this morning? >> my god. >> it is wednesday wednesday, july 10th, as you look at an empty summertime square. with us on set mike barnicle, former communications director for george w. bush and former senior adviser to mccain presidential campaign nicolle wallace, the former chair of the rnc michael steele and political analyst visiting professor at nyu, former democratic congressman from the great state
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of tennessee mr. harold ford jr. >> good morning, sir. >> good morning. >> joe and mika have the morning off. start right there. eliot spitzer on this program, nicole you were here, took some tough questions from joe and mika and from mark halperin. how did you think he did? >> look, it felt like a very genuine moment and i think we all know that doesn't happen very often in politics. he i think responded to mika's request to give an answer that wasn't scripted, that wasn't rehearsed and when he answered the question about what had changed he talked about pain and all the pain he endured and he got emotional. i think it was a moment for a pundit to recognize and sit quietly and watch the journalists do the job. i had the benefit of sitting and watching everybody and i thought everybody did a good job. i thought mika and joe and mark halperin did an excellent job with a very uncomfortable line of questioning and i thought that eliot spitzer, for his
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part, delivered unrehearsed, real, honest, frank, answers that i hadn't seen him give before. >> harold, what's your sense as a new yorker of this city's willingness, whether it be for anthony weiner or eliot spitzer to move past some of that stuff in their personal lives? >> i think voters are very forgiving. new york is unique place in that you have people here who understand it's second lives and second chances and redemption are part of everything in life including business and personal affairs. it's curious as you watch both of these candidates, talk about the body of work outside of their mistakes which is what you want people to look at. in eliot's case you wonder if some of the investigations and things he's done in the past, if he's willing to forgive others for some of what he believes their transgressions and mistakes may have been. on anthony's side listen to him talk about the pain and what he's gone through and you wonder whether or not, you know, he made a decision not to tell the truth about when he was
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confronted with whether i think his system had been hacked and may have misrepresented or lied about that, whether he learned from that. ultimately i think eliot had the best answer at the end of the day when he said voters will make this decision. i think they have every right to run and lay before the voters with their vision and ideas and ultimately these races, the may mayor's and comptroller's who has the best ideas to advance the city. we haven't gotten to that point in this campaign, particularly in either of those campaigns. michael, you would hope the main reason you run is to advance those ideas. time will tell. >> the candidates running for either of these offices in the democratic party right now is really creating the opportunity for these gentlemen to be in play. >> and to be talked about. >> and to be talked about. i submit that if there were candidates of equal or greater substance without the baggage and the mea culpa tour behind them, that they would not be at this point in the campaign.
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having said that, you're right. people are very forgiving. we, you know -- i think a lot of these folks when you go back and look at the history of the last 20 years, from gary hart, bill clinton, vitter and so forth, to the present day, candidates have learned how to address and respond to these issues. so they know how to play the redemption card now. and i'm being cynical, yes, but this is politics is a cynical sport. and the fact of the matter is, you strike that tone when you contrast a gary hart who was combative and daring the press to follow him and challenging and pushing back the people going you know what -- >> hindsight was not smart. >> really? >> to the current, you know -- i just -- i admit my foiables and regret my sins and people respond to that. so, you know, this is going to be interesting to watch how new yorkers i think new yorkers more than most have seen their share
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of these things and know how to fair it out the genuine from the crazy and the crap and we'll see what they do at the polls. >> before we talk about eliot spitzer getting elected he has to get himself on the ballot, about 4,000 signatures on a petition. >> by tomorrow. >> apparently he's having a little trouble doing that. all the candidates have until tomorrow. it's 3750 signatures to be exact. spitzer said he hopes to collect more than 7,000 signatures but that may be easier said than done. according to the "new york times" this morning after a few hours at union square, the campaign ended up with more complaints from volunteers about the heat than they did signatures from potential voters. spitzer's democrat rivals say they plan to scrutinize every signature he gets. for comparison sake scott stringer who is running against eliot spitzer for comptroller has collected more than 100,000 signatures according to his campaign manager. here's former governor on "morning joe" yesterday on why he deserves a second chance.
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>> i have spent five years reflecting, thinking, apologizing. i'm ready to ask for forgiveness. it's not easy. i'm ready to ask. i failed. i had flaws. made hor risk judgments. was unfaithful to my family the electorate. that's why i resigned. what i did was not only wrong but a consequence of huber russ and failure of judgment and self-indulgence. >> how are you different than you were five, six years ago? what has changed? personally? >> a lot of pain. >> of who you are? >> a lot of pain. >> that's it? >> yeah. you go through that pain, you change. >> you don't have to like eliot spitzer or believe those tears were real to admit that he did sit here and take some pretty tough questions for about 20 minutes yesterday and i think that's -- anthony weiner has done the same thing, mark sanford did the same thing, to say i have to take this head on and answer these questions until it passes and then get on to the
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issues. that was the first round for spitzer, taking that fire. >> to me, it's interesting, and you alluded to it, michael, the process, what the political process has become now in this country. not just for running for c comptroller in new york city but for nearly most offices at every level. this new york city is not lacrosse, wisconsin. >> right. >> this is what you get. running for mayor and running for comptroller. people don't want to put their names out there in public, largely because of the spotlight sometimes too harsh a spotlight, that the media puts on them, i think. you know, we want 15 years of your tax returns and your wife's returns and things like that. i think there are an awful lot of people who have a lot to give who won't run. eliot spitzer, you know, he's -- let's see if he gets the signatures to get on the ballot. you raised another i think critical point with regard to eliot spitzer, what does he do about his actions as attorney
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general of the state of new york when he took several people to court, maybe on somewhat flimsy evidence. >> trot a lot of people in the -- tried a lot of people in the press before they got to court, and then they were cleared. >> so the forgiveness theme, does he allude to that at all as he continues to run? >> those questions will come out. >> yeah. >> i look forward as a voter, i have not made my mind up. i think scott stringer is an impressive guy and accomplished a lot. i would imagine i'm not alone in that position. >> what's the over/under on how much ken langone contributes to any -- >> i think it's substantial. >> pretty big. >> pretty big. >> lick question dating some assets right now, make the cash available. for what it's worth "the new york post" has moved on. no spitzer on the front page. important coverage of miss usa and why she can't get a date in new york. >> you're kidding. >> more on that later in "morning joe."
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>> let's turn to serious news here. we have new details on what happened inside the cockpit of asiana flight 214 moments before it crashed under a san francisco runway. federal investigators say the pilots thought they set the plane's auto throttle when they came in for landing. nbc's tom costello reports. >> reporter: new pictures of the crash scene in san francisco. the top priority for investigators has been to interview all four pilots who were on board flight 214, including the veteran captain who was new to the 777 and was at the controls saturday. the teaching captain told investigators he realized at 200 feet they were coming in too slow and too low. >> he recognized that the auto throttles were not maintaining speed and he established a go around attitude. he went to push the throttles forward but he stated that the pilot had already -- the other pilot had already pushed the throttles forward. >> reporter: investigators are not alarmed that a veteran captain was making his first landing attempt at sfo at 777.
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>> no one is going to walk into a cockpit with 100 landings under their belt. they have to get experience. >> reporter: re tired united captain ross aimer teaches new pilot if the approach isn't perfect, abort the landing attempt. >> decisive. be decisive. if you think you're too high or too slow, do something immediately. >> reporter: the president and ceo of asiana arrived to a media frenzy in san francisco, promising full cooperation with the investigation. meanwhile the only crew memberer to speak to korean media, flight attendant, le, worked frantically to free passengers and other crew members trapped inside the plane. >> translator: actually i was not thinking but acts. as soon as i heard emergency escape i conducted the evacuation. >> reporter: two teenage girls died, pun possibly hit by an arriving emergency vehicle pfr of the more than 180 injured, 26 remain hospitalized, six in critical condition including one
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child. a tea kwando team described the aftermath. >> when i came down the chute i looked over at the wing and i could still see fuel dropping from the wing. >> reporter: meanwhile, questions about why some passengers grabbed their luggage, purses, carry-ons, duty-free shopping before escaping the burning plane. then the urgent phone calls and text messages to loved ones. >> it's a life and death situation for you to stop and get your bag as opposed to get off the aircraft and think about all the other people coming behind you. >> you were saying you look at that plane, it's incredible only two people died. it's terrible that two people died, but the fact that only two died out of more than 300, it's unreal. >> i was about to use the word miraculous. to think about how far airline safety has come. it's stunning you can have a landing like that, an emergency like that, and sadly two people lost their lives but everyone else seemed to have gotten off. >> the pilots did probably
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allegedly did a lot of things wrong, but the flight attendants, look at the one that had a broken tailbone and was running up the aisle carrying people on her back. >> and she looks -- >> and refused to get off until everyone else was off. incredible. >> amazing. >> other news back, you know, boston style news. >> yeah. go ahead. go. >> this is mike barnicle's area of expertise. when two gangsters come face to face in a courtroom expect things to get heated. yesterday kevin weeks, former partner of james whitey bulger took the stand and testified against his former mentor. weeks accused by the defense of cutting a deal with prosecutors so he would serve just five years in prison. he was then asked if he felt any remorse for his role in the five killings. mike will be mr. weeks. i will be mr. bulger. >> this is the tale incidentally of a loser versus a sociopath. weeks is the loser, jim whitey bulger the sociopath. >> which one you? >> he's the loser, i'm the
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sociopath. >> let's hear it. >> want me to start. >> this is from the transcript yesterday in court. >> it's fun when joe and mika aren't here. >> we do role playing. why not? why not. >> okay. >> you're first. >> yeah, five people are dead. yeah, it bothers me, we killed people who were rats and i had the two biggest rats right next to me. >> you suck. >> f you okay. >> f you too. >> what do you want to do? >> and scene. >> yeah. >> bravo. they're shaking in their boots down on broadway. >> yesterday's exchange is the first time bulger and weeks had spoken to each other in 16 years. >> maybe. >> what's the nature of that relationship right there? going back through the years? >> kevin weeks is a neighborhood kid, guy, who used to work as a bouncer in a bar in south boston
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that whitey bulger used to frequent. kevin was pretty good with his fists. used to beat people up. whitey recognized someone who could perhaps be useful to him in shaking down others in the neighborhood. drug dealers and everything like that. and the employment of kevin weeks began in the early 1980s and eventually kevin was along for the ride when bulger and his partner, principle partner, steve themmy began killing people in front of kevin weeks, not that he hadn't killed people before. kevin was fully incorporated into the gang. and it was sort of a father/son relationship for many, many years until bulger split. until after bulger split because kevin weeks was in contact with jim bulger when whitey bulger was on the lam for several years. >> put it in perspective for those of us who watched "departed." who played weeks? do you recall who may have played him? >> that was a combination.
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nicholson played the bulger guy. >> right. >> but it wasn't damo or dicaprio because he wasn't a cop. >> that was a combination. those two roles were a melding of several other roles. >> in case you hadn't noticed mike covered this case for years for "the boston globe." not just randomly familiar -- >> whitey bulger's brother bill bulger president of the massachusetts senate for years and refused to talk to me for years because i used to put in the paper that whitey bulger was nothing -- no drugs moved in south boston without whitey bulger and his brother would say no, he does things, but not drugs. doesn't do drugs. which of course nothing could move including cocaine or heroin without his permission. bill bulger told me no, i heard from higher authority than you, who know more than you, he doesn't do drugs. the fbi would tell bill bulger he's not doing drugs. now the fbi agent is in jail for life. >> incredible story. >> yeah.
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>> the true story. good acting. well done. >> well done guys. >> very good. >> there's more. we could do the whole transcript. >> every hour you should just spread it out. >> the transcript. >> last night we got a little word from up in alaska from former governor sarah palin who hinted that she may be mulling a return to public office in a radio interview yesterday. governor palin said she is considering running next year for u.s. senate right there in alaska. >> i've considered it because people have requested me considering it, but i'm still waiting to see, you know, what the lineup will be and hoping that, there again, there will be some new bloods, new energy, not just kind of picking from the same old politicians in the state. >> the race is next year. 2014. >> why don't you play that out? >> i don't think nicole -- >> nicole could have done -- >> i speak pailen. >> she's been through enough. >> the democratic senator mark
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begich holds that seat. two prominent alaskan republicans announced their bids,made treadwell and joe miller. >> i just -- i was trying to figure out listening to her, as i'm always trying to figure out listening to her, who the new buds are. is she a new bud or saying that people have requested her to run but she'd prefer a new bud. so it's unclear really, does she see herself as part of the old guard or does she see herself as something new. i'm not sure how she sees her own prospects. >> i think she sees herself as something new. >> a new bud. >> yeah. i mean and that's generally been sarah's position in most political fights, whether it's within the party or externally, she's always positioned herself outside of that typical mainstream group of leadership and so i think that yeah, i mean a lot of people talk to her about it and all of that, but i
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think also she's looking down the road as a warmup to '16, not to say that sarah is running, positioning herself maybe as a senator from alaska on a national stage to lend some voice, some stronger voice to a -- >> hip threatically. say you're considering running as a republican, in an important state that happens to lean a little more blue at times. would you want her on the ballot in 2014 as a big voice? because if she skies to run, she will be a huge voice in the party and a huge voice that the press will look to. >> it doesn't matter. it doesn't matter. >> doesn't affect -- >> whether she's on the ballot or off the ballot. if sarah palin injects her voice into a national conversation in any form it's obviously going to bleed across the spectrum. that piece of it is largely irrelevant because the press will make her relevant to any conversation the minute she says something. if you're running for the u.s. senate in your home state or running for congress or even for governor, yeah -- >> hypothetically.
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>> the difference is -- i think the difference, though, is that if she's running, she will be asked to weigh in on all the policy debates that a serious candidate is going to have to. if you're running for office in the state you have to weigh in on how you would vote on the immigration bill. you will have to weigh in on serious debates. the challenge would be whether she is talking and speaking out as a commentator, reality tv host, gets her own cooking show or runs for president, the kinds of questions she'd have to field would be intertwined with the serious policy debates if she were running. >> if she is running her own cooking show and being asked about what's going on in the middle east, versus being a candidate for the united states senate and being asked. if she's running her own cooking show and comments on that, yeah, i could see that bleed out to other campaigns. >> but that's what i'm saying. if she's running for office, she would be asked more serious questions. >> that's her view on that question. >> the trick question, if
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someone asked her where the middle east was. >> on her cooking show. >> if she could figure it out. >> i would like to see a palin/wallace reunion. let's make this happen. >> she has a following and it has endured. >> it would be interesting to see what she does. >> coming up on "morning joe," nbc's political director chuck todd joins us and jean chatzky, we'll talk to the aforementioned scott stringer facing eliot spitzer in that race for new york city comptroller and later actress and tv host aisha tyler. up next harry reid feels sorry for speaker john boehner. jim vandehei tells us why. first bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> good morning to you, willie. we haven't had a lot of bad weather, tornadoes or flooding in our country lately, but in china, a different story. bridges and buildings washed away. impressive flooding shot out of sichuan province, southwest portion of that province. look at that building washed away in those floodwaters.
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incredible stuff. chantal, this was the storm that formed two, three days ago which now traveling through the caribbean. the warm waters. last night it almost fell apart completely. a little bit left of this storm. i have very little concerns about this storm as it approaches florida and the southeast. it will bring some rain, maybe localized flooding but it will not be a devastating storm for the southeast. travel trouble spot this morning is pittsburgh to cleveland. lot of heavy rain for you in the ohio valley up through areas of the northeast. later today you will deal with thunderstorms and the potential for isolated severe weather. by the way, our friends in dallas today, you're up to 101. there are hot it temps to be found in the central plains. what a nice shot of the sunrise. another warm, humid day for many of us across the country. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. "i'm part of an american success story,"
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"that starts with one of the world's most advanced distribution systems," "and one of the most efficient trucking networks," "with safe, experienced drivers." "we work directly with manufacturers," "eliminating costly markups," "and buy directly from local farmers in every region of the country." "when you see our low prices, remember the wheels turning behind the scenes, delivering for millions of americans, everyday. "dedication: that's the real walmart" in miami, coca-cola is coming together with latino leaders to support hispanicize, and the adelante movement. teaching tools for success, and fostering creativity. these programs are empowering people to lead positive change, and helping them discover how great a little balance can feel. through initiatives like these, our goal is to inspire more than three million people
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6:25. take a look at some of the morning papers from our para parade "orlando sentinel" the defense expected to rest this week in the murder trial of george zimmerman after calling a critical witness to the stand. yesterday a criminal pathologist testified a bullet hole around trayvon's martin's chest appears the 17-year-old was on top zimmerman at the time of the shooting. "boston globe," dzhokhar tsarnaev will make his first appearance in federal court today. victims' family members and survivors of the attack are expected to be at the heavily attended hearing. the 19-year-old suspect faces a litany of charges in the spree of violence in april that left four people dead and some 200 people injured. "chicago sun times" canadian
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authorities opening a criminal probe in the deadly crash of oil tanker train cars in quebec. the death toll at 15 with dozens missing. the coroner's office said some of the victims may have been, quote, vaporized in last saturday's explosion. terrorism ruled out the head of the rail company that operates the train accused local firefighters of disabling the train's air brakes fighting a smaller fire aboard earlier in the day. the chief denies improper procedure by his crew. >> that's an amazing story. "usa today" the united states coast guard says a combination of water and gas is leaking from a well 75 miles off the coast of louisiana. the leak began after crews lost control on monday evening while attempting to plug the well. >> "new york daily news," mexico has officially surpassed the united states as the most obese country in the world. according to a study by the united nation, mexico has a 32.8% obesity rate overtaking
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the u.s. one in six suffer from diabetes where the disease is estimated to kill nearly 70,000 people a year. >> going to leave that story alone. "baltimore sun" a democratic congresswoman introduced legislation to set up a national park on the moon. the apollo lunar landing legacy act plans to preserve the landing site as a park preventing future activity there including mining. the plan also aims to ensure the preservation of artifacts left behind by u.s. astronauts such as flags and golf balls. in a place where we have trouble -- >> i know that sounds like really nuts. >> it does. >> but when you stop to think about it, i see the logic at the end of it in terms of as exploration -- >> private exploration begins to go in that direction and looking
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down the road i can understand what they're saying. right now it's not part of the conversation, so we'll just move on. >> okay. >> she's a great congresswoman. >> i knew there was something behind that. >> mitt romney and paul ryan may have lost the election but their campaign t-shirts have found a good home at a school in kenya. a philanthropist involved in the romney/ryan campaign donated the shirts to villages of parents unable to care for them. part of the orbit village project. shirts in various sizes, styles and colors. the children all smiles rocking the romney/ryan t-shirts. >> joining us now with a look at the politico playbook the executive editor there, jim vandehei. good morning. >> good morning. >> all right. let's talk a little immigration. speaker john boehner got a lot on his plate right now. senate majority leader harry reid shed a few crocodile tears. >> speaker boehner is trying to decide where he is, pick an
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issue. how about the farm bill. last year's farm bill, this year's farm bill. he has dissension in his own ranks. we know that. now immigration, he is saying, a bipartisan bill that we've done, he is not going to touch that. running ads, conservative organizations are running ads saying mr. boehner, and republicans, why don't you do something about this. so i -- i guess i feel sorry for the speaker. >> so this is all reaction, of course, to speaker boehner saying the other day that the house is not going to take up the senate bill on immigration. take us behind the curtain of what speaker boehner's dealing with with house republicans on this ish. >> >> i don't think anyone saw this coming three or four months ago. i think immigration reform is very unlikely to happen this year or fex year, if ever right now. look at what's happening among republicans. marco rubio, i saw nicole on msnbc last night, talking about what a good job rubio has done in trying to build conservative
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support and he has. he was able to defang a lot of conservative talkers, get support in the senate, but at the end of the day he only got 14 total republican votes in the senate. the weekly standard and the national review doing a joint editorial against that bill. in the house, boehner has nowhere near half his caucus in support of anything remotely resembling that senate bill. they want to kill that bill. they bapts to do something very small. they want to do it incrementally. it means this whole movement towards trying to do immigration reform which is policy and important, this movement among republicans of trying to repair their image with hispanics are taking a huge blow. republicans walk away from the election saying if there's one lesson we learned we got to fix things with hispanics. they might be ability about to make things worse. >> even "the wall street journal" calls on him to not
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walk away. including for millions of conserve tifrs and don't let the shrill voices in the party win the day. >> the journal is right about that. at a deeper level, what's going on, that's immy nating from grass roots communities around the country and that is, this general view that certainly the senate bill, the idea you're going to sort of do border security as sort of an after effect beyond, you know, anything else, is not something that's palatable to the base. secondly, i think a lot of folks are looking at this going, you know, at the end of the day, the hispanic vote is not just going to drop into the gop pocket because we do immigration. there's a wholesale effort that has to go on in other areas as well. so a lot of conservatives are saying why are we making this one bankshot when there's other shots we need to take. we need to take the step but the fact of the matter is that vote is not going to automatically appear if you sign off on an
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immigration bill tomorrow and think in 2014 hispanics will be lining up saying i'm gop too. >> this was the peril of ascribing any political motive to do this. this is what george w. bush warned about. this is what bush warned about in may when he talked about the motives for this cannot, must not, be political. because the -- that empowers all of the pundits and shrill voices in our party, that empowers the politics to overtake the policy. what rubio's office has done is to really improve upon our failed effort in 2006 where george w. bush did not bring along all the conservative voices, but george w. bush's motive was always purely policy to fix a problem that as a texas governor he knew was badly needed of reform. now we've shifted to doing this for purely political motives and so when the politics looks shaky we lose our will. it's a disaster. >> what happens to the republican party when more and more people, not just republicans, come to the
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conclusion, you know, we're sick and tired of hearing these people in politics talking about the base, their base. >> right. >> what about the country? >> no. fair question. and a fair point. but if i'm a congressman and, you know, my district is comprised of 90% of that base, that's not hispanic, or doesn't have an interest in this issue i'm going to reflect that base, i'm going to reflect that constituency. a lot of members i've talked to and heard from staff wise, or otherwise, are saying that's down the road. our district may not ever change or, you know, if we lose some votes, you know, it will be a small percentage we can live with that. that's why they're staying on the broader argument about border security because they feel secure on that front as having to deal with the other slippery slope of the dynamics of immigration. >> so you're saying we don't get these things done until we redraw districts? >> i think that's what jim is alluding to down the road. >> vandehei, you think that may be the case?
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>> probably. listen, it's a great reminder that for a house member, again, most of these guys are white. most of them represent predominantly white districts. so they're not really thinking about even when making political calculations they're not thinking about the hispanic or minority vote. they're thinking how do i win re-election. it's a reminder of how impervious they are to persuasion of party leaders. they don't care what george bush has to say on this issue. they don't care what marco rubio has to say on this issue or paul ryan has to say on this issue. they care what their constituents have to say on this issue. you have to understand that every time a vote comes before the house, everyone always assumes, wait, they're going to move with the politics, it's background checks for guns, it's immigration reform, it's gay marriage, look where the country is going. that might be where the country is going. not where they're going and not where their constituents are. >> as nicole mentioned, president george w. bush is making a speech today at a citizenship ceremony in dallas
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at his presidential library. interesting to hear what he says about immigration reform. >> time for term limits. >> thanks, jim. >> have fun today. >> coming up new details about the performance enhancing drug investigation, how ryan braun is responding to questions from major league baseball. sports is next. i'm jennifer hudson. i hate getting up in the morning. i love cheese. i love bread. i'm human! and the new weight watchers 360 program lets me be. the reason i'm still in this body feelin' so good isn't because i never go out and enjoy the extra large, extra cheese world we live in. it's because i do. and you can too, with the weight watchers 360 program. the power to lose weight like never before. join now for $1. offer ends july 27th. the weight watchers 360 program. because it works. vietnam in 1972.
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time for sports. some troubling new details coming out in the aaron hernandez murder case after the judge ordered documents to be released to the public one of hernandez's alleged accomplices carlos ortiz reportedly told police that hernandez admitted to friends to killing odin lloyd. it was revealed that hernandez was not cooperative with police when they first showed up at his house at one point, slamming his front door in their faces. hernandez has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder in the death of odin lloyd. hernandez also being investigated for his connection to a double murder in boston last year. court records show a vehicle related to the incident has been tracked to hernandez's hometown of bristol connecticut and was rented in hernandez's name. a lot of ugly details out in that story. in baseball suspensions may be coming for as many as 20 major league players according
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to the espn's outside the lines. sources tell espn that brewer's slugger ryan braun refused to answer questions with major league baseball officials over his connection to tony bosch and biogenesis. a clinic that allegedly provided performance enhancing drugs to a number of players. yankees third baseman alex rodriguez likely to meet with mlb officials in the coming weeks. the commissioner's office is expected to suspend braun, rodriguez and nearly 20 other players linked to biogenesis including nelson cruz and melky cabrera. looks like a-rod is going to get at least 20 or so for his involvement. remember that 100 game figure had come out a few weeks ago. >> i think he's going to get more than 20 games. >> 50, something like that. >> yeah. and i think it will probably come down within the next couple weeks after the all-star game next week. >> he'll miss the season then. >> yeah. >> it becomes interesting to see what happens to him, what his future is in baseball. >> and then, you know, he has more trouble with the hip. as he tries to recooperate rate.
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and then he retires. the insurance company picks up the bulk of the contract. the yankees off the hook. a-rod with incredible potential and dazzling talent disappears into the darker shadows of baseball history. >> incredible when you look at -- >> depressing. >> first ten years of his career to think he will be wiped off the map of baseball history. >> amazing player. yesterday's highlights the white sox alex rios tied an american league record went six for six, became the 32nd american league player ever to accomplish that feat going 6 for 6. the white sox beat the tigers 11-4. twins and rays fly ball in foul territory, he runs a long way and the ball bounces off his face. oh. >> that hurts. >> takes one on the chin literally. he's okay. jogged to his position. how are you okay after that? >> you're not. >> right. >> right.
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he did not sleep last night. >> up next the must-read opinion pages. "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. stacey: my daughter zoe had her first open heart surgery... when she was only fifteen hours old. handing her over for surgery is the hardest thing i've... ever had to do.
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more saving. more doing. that's the power of the home depot. right now, get whole-home installation for just 37 bucks. in arizona yesterday a bell tolled for each of the 19 firefighters killed in the yarnell hill wildfire. thousands of first responders came from far and wide to remember the men who were overcome by the flames. outside thousands more withstood the heat of summer to pay a final tribute to the members of the granite mountain hotshots. the lone surviving member of the crew read the unit's prayer as vice president joe biden invoked a saying, quote, all men are created equal but then a few become firefighters."
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>> first day on the line i should answer death's call, bless my hotshot crew, my family, one and all. thank you and i miss my brothers. >> i know the cliff jumper or mountain biker, football player, iraqi vet, marine, son of a firefighter, i know them. confident, committed, determined, trust worthy, passionate, be they were firefighters. i know them because they saved the life of my two sons. >> the vice president biden doing a nice job there yesterday and your heart breaks for the 20th guy, brendan mcdono the
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lookout that day. >> the vice president of the united states, there my friend, is a real human being. a real human being. >> this is his highest and best i think role as vice president. this is something that most presidents step into very comfortably. obama hasn't been as comfortable as his vice president has in these roles, but in feeling things that we're all feeling, and in combining humor and humanity, this vice president has been stellar. >> he gives articulation to -- articulation to what people are feeling so when he talks about the iraqi veteran and, you know, the everyday guy, out there and connects it to these 19 men the way he did, people are like, yeah, you know, that's my dad, that was my uncle. he personalizes it in a unique way that we haven't seen a lot of others do. >> president obama has been great at times like after newtown, he's had some great moments, but nobody throws his arm around the country the way vice president biden does. >> you know, be i -- i love
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politicians who love people and whose, as you say, michael, not only personalized but it was so personal to joe biden, he talked about his own family. >> right. >> i yearn for that kind of politics. people in politics, that's what -- in its best that's what politics at its retail level is all about. >> you know, nearly every weekend, he goes back home to wilmington, delaware. he doesn't stay in washington. if you ask joe biden for the top three best restaurants in washington he would have no clue. probably name two burger kings and a mcdonald's. he's not of washington. he's of wilmington, scranton, pennsylvania, of the country, knowing who was in home depot and goes shopping on saturdays and stuff like that. >> yeah. >> and george w. bush for flaws which people talk about all the time his greatest asset was he was always in touch with a painful moment the country had, he always went home to texas and he was always surrounded by his
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friends from life that predated the presidency and joe biden has that -- >> the whole biden family, bo and a-- beau and all of them tht way. >> speaking of politicians that love people, harold ford jr. has written in the hill this morning writing about the keystone pipeline. harold says it is in the national interest. quote, i believe the president will ultimately approve the keystone proposal not only because it passes his litmus test of not significantly exacerbating the problem of carbon pollution because of the important private sector infrastructure investment will create jobs while making the u.s. more energy independent. a report from the national research council concluded that diluted bitumen isn't any more -- eventual crude oil or likely to produce pipeline spills. the president should be applauded for boldly leading on climate change. there are more important battles worth fighting but the keystone is not one of them.
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seven in ten americans believe the project is in the national interest. and the facts in terms of science, engineering, safety and economics, make a compelling case in favor of approval. you can hear about people watching this screaming about environmental factors which are real saying that the idea this is going to create 10,000 or 20,000 jobs is inflated. a lot of those are temporary construction jobs. >> even if they're right, pay a lot more than other temporary jobs we look at in our economy. it will have a big multiplier effect further. the tax revenues that will go to those states will deal with education challenges, water and sewer projects across the country. two, the environmental factors have been addressed. no pipeline, no project has been more studied more scrutinized than this one. the national research council which is not some partisan group, probably leans more to the left, said the product that will be transported through this pipeline is no more corrosive
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than conventional crude oil. study after study to show it. >> the state department. obama's state department came out and gave him all the political cover you think he needs. what's the white house's -- >> if you don't transport this by pipeline, you transport it by ship or rail, more dangerous for those concerned about a leak or explosion. if you do this might allow us to build a new round of pipelines across the country and show how we do it in a safe and better way. >> there's not much reason to worry for people concerned if you live in the state of nebraska you can get an oil change by turning on your water tap? >> let's talk off set but i don't believe that -- >> all jokes aside, that shouldn't be a concern. >> if everything you said is true then what is president obama waiting for. >> i think the president laid out -- i think he's been -- i think he's moved too slowly on this. i think he's been consistent. he's made clear it cannot exacerbate the problem of carbon pollution. study after study shows it won't. >> he knows that. so this is all -- this is political left concerns he has
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about exactly what the blowup and reaction as you noted, willie, folks out there screaming at the set because of what harold wrote, that's what the president is ultimately concerned about. that's who he's listening to. >> i think he approves it. i think you're right. he'll approve it for all the reasons enumerated not only in this column but others have written including the journal and others have said jobs and safety have been addressed. >> read harold's full piece at the hill about the keystone pipeline. coming up next, news you can't use. we showed you bubba watson's new golf course hover craft. the ultimate golf cart. you can ride it. we'll tell you where. keep it on "morning joe." ever ybody has different investment objectives, ever ideas, goals, appetite for risk. you can't say 'one size fits all'. it doesn't. that's crazy.
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. time for a little news you can't use. before we get to this, e-mails and tweets, michael steele, wondering is the stash back for michael steele? it would appear we had the early makings of the return of the steele stash. >> it's slipping its way. >> it's coming back. >> america wants it back based on what i'm reading. >> i like it. >> bring it on back. bring it on back. one story to tell you about here, golf, not intriguing enough for you, this is going to drive you to the course. the golf channel reporting windy
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noll golf course in springfield, ohio, will offer hovercrafts as golf carts. they sponsor masters champ bubba watson. employees say the carts will cost you about $230 a player to rent and they will be available by late august. tearing up the golf course. >> i mean that's more than the golf -- >> right. >> might as well ride around the course a couple times. >> just take a couple hour spin around the course. >> they go right over most of my balls. >> in the drink. >> up next, chuck todd joins our conversation. back with chuck and the day's big news next.
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>> that's the important stuff. >> welcome back to "morning joe." 7:00 here in new york city. joining us now from washington, nbc news chief white house correspondent political director host of the daily rundown which comes on every morning after this show, chuck todd. good morning. >> good morning, willie. >> lead story from this desk where mike barnicle and i sit is -- >> yasiel puig is in second place. >> he nailed it. >> that's exactly where we were going. how is he not on the all-star team, yasiel puig? >> do we believe that these -- have you noticed what mlb has done. they just tell you who's winning and in second. they don't give us any vote totals. we don't see anything. this thing smells to high heaven, right. trying to build crazy drama and
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shockingly we really think -- look, i love freddie freeman, very important on my fantasy team, but do we think major league baseball, who's counting the votes here, will let freddie freeman win this thing? >> they might. >> barnicle, i don't believe it. >> they might. >> i'm a conspiracy theorist. i want puig in there too. i also want -- >> how many times have you voted? >> you know, i had to help my son vote for ian desmond. that was important to him. frankly i can't explain why ian desmond somehow got left off the all-star team at all. when you look at those five guys, ian desmond by position, what did he get relegated to this. >> we should point out to those on the edge of their seats at home he's a short stop for the washington nationals. >> maybe has 30 home runs in his bat this year. >> i think he does. >> he's on my fantasy team. huge. >> got to get puig on the team. >> puig. >> now that we've lost 99% of our audience --
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>> no, we haven't. >> 98%. >> talking about ian desmond. chuck, i want to get your take on this and see how much stock you put in it. sarah palin yesterday talking to sean hannity considering a run next year for senate in alaska where she'll challenge mark begich because she says she's been approached. listen to what she says. >> i've considered it because people have requested me considering it, but i'm still waiting to see, you know, what the lineup will be and hoping, there again, there will be some new buds, new energy, not just kind of picking from the same old politicians in the state. >> chuck, be what do you think? any chance she runs? >> i'll be shocked. i think anybody who has followed sarah palin's political career would be shocked. you could make an argument, democrats will make this argument, they would love the idea of her running, being able to raise money nationally
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against her it would help begich polarize the race. he is a -- he bwon the last tim because he made the race about the incumbent. a tough place for a democrat to win. if he gets the opportunity to make the race about somebody else and let's just say if sarah palin ran, it wouldn't be about mark begich anymore. you know, but yeah, i think we know this is somebody who didn't finish her term as governor why should we expect anything she would follow through on this. >> what is her future then? say she doesn't jump back into elective politics. who does sarah palin become in american life? >> i assume -- by the way, i assume she does run for president in 2016 in some gats fly way. last-minute way. because i think -- no, i say this, whatever -- whatever you believe that she's up to it does feel like it's about making money and sarah palin inc will need more ink, so my assumption has always been, she's been toying with this idea if the
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republicans go the wrong way there should be a third party and all this stuff. i think nothing would shock me in 2016 that she would do sort of a -- like i said, a gadfly type of run, not like a serious professional run but something to make a statement and maybe help the speaking fees. >> do you chuck, feel any responsibility as a leading voice in the mainstream media for continuing to egg her on. the more attention you all pay to her, the more -- >> are we talking about eliot spitzer or sarah palin? >> the whole kit and caboodle really. >> i agree. >> a really important immigration bill before the house. there's some -- >> that's going nowhere. >> heroic things senate republicans like marco rubio have done, george w. bush is out there. but it's tantalizing, it's irresistible to talk about the human failures of anthony weiner and eliot spitzer, about the circus that sarah palin
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brilliantly creates around everything she says and does. i mean what does it say about all of us? i'm not holding myself blameless in any regard. you know, front row seat at the circus for me. >> no. i think the celebritication of politics has damaged the system. i think the reason we're in the mode we're in right now where you can't -- where even trying to imply meant a law that's already been passed which is what the president is trying to do with health care is now a campaign, right, where everything is a campaign and everything is -- i mean, you know, be i think it's all a part of this and i go back to like i said the celeb brification of politics. sarah palin was a part of that. before that we're toying with politics is something cool for people to do to make a name or make -- or to keep themselves in the news. and that's i think what's damaged the political system, right, because you think if it's just some sort of clown show where people do it as a hobby,
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why should i trust them to actually write laws, why should i trust the laws they're writing. it feeds into this notion of why is there a growing distrust of government and ability to manage or do big things. you know, i think it's all contributing to this. >> all right. let's move on and talk exactly about what is happening. nicole mentioned immigration. a logjam in congress from student loans, two immigrations. senator harry reid taking some shots at speaker john boehner. here's mr. reid commenting on the house speaker's workload. >> speaker boehner is trying to decide where he is, pick an issue. how about the farm bill. last year's farm bill, this year's farm bill. he has dissension in his own ranks. we know that. now immigration, he is saying a bipartisan bill that we've done, he is not going to touch that. they are running ads, conservative organizations are
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running ads saying mr. boehner and republicans why don't you do something about this. i guess i feel sorry for the speaker. >> chuck, bring us up to speed with where we are on immigration, referring to the fact that speaker boehner said his house will not take up the senate bill. where are we? any hope for a movement on this? >> looks like we're in a bad place on immigration if you were an immigration reform advocate, hoping to see this bill die, you should be very happy this week. what you've seen is if you look at the republican party and the elected officials, they're basically three different groups. the group that you see with the marco rubio, bob corker, that group, who wants to get anything passed, get it done, get the issue behind them. a group that's never going to support it, thatting th anythino on immigration is amnesty and then the group in the middle a lot did not vote for the senate bill that were in the senate and i think that was a -- that should have been the early warning sign for a lot of people to realize this thing is in a little more trouble than you
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realize. without that group, it's -- in the house, i would say somewhere between 80 and 120 members, without a good chunk of that group, i don't see how boehner politically feels comfortable doing much on immigration, that includes a path to citizenship. when you see the rhetoric, the permission slips out there, you had this joint op-ed by bill crystal, rich laurie, saying kill the bill but saying you can be pro immigration and against the senate bill, then yesterday which had a little bit of looking like he put his finger in the wind, bobby jindal, governor of louisiana, thinking about running in 2016 sees where this is going with the base came out with an op-ed that says the senate bill is bad, i'm pro immigration. you're starting to see people looking now for a reason to be against it where three months ago you had these republicans that were sitting in the middle here looking for a reason to be for it, finding ways to get it, now they're looking for ways to be against it. this is why you see a lot of people suddenly looking at the tea leaves saying, this thing
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may not happen and it may not happen in a big way. now this drama could play itself out over six months and we'll see, but right now it's hard to envision how a bill with some path to citizenship gets through the house of representatives. >> chuck, do any of the people who you know in politic s and that's everyone in washington, d.c., are they at all concerned about the increasingly low turnouts in election after election after election, largely i think rooted in the fact that people out in the country are on to how incompetent this particular congress is now and has been for several years and how they cannot do the job for the country because they keep alluding, both parties, to their base, rather than to the country? >> mike, you're picking at a pet peeve of mine. i think the most underreported story of 2012 was that turnout was down and turnout was down across the board. there's been people that have been writing hey, the turnout was done among white voters.
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when you look at the patterns turnout was down among all votes by percentage when you look be at what the rate of population growth was. we've seen dramatically low turnouts in all over the country. i think you and i have talked about this on the air before. i don't feel like the politicians see it. i think they all are looking at it's all short term. i think they see -- they know their way to victory in 2014 if you're the republicans or 2016 if you're the democrats and almost seems to be satisfied they can just get through the next election. i don't sense, and this has been something that i thought you would see more larger political leaders step up and realize, there's something -- this growing distrust is a larger problem here. washington we know this dysfunction, we now know what it's doing to the public. the casual civic-minded individual who isn't only looking through blue glasses or red glasses, is saying, forget about it. >> yeah. >> michael, you made the point
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in our last hour because after the 2012 presidential election when mitt romney got clobbered among latino voters there was going to be a come to jesus moment for the republican party where they had to do something on immigration to change the way latino voters feel aboutp areps. you say if i'm a congressman in a district where the vast majority of my voters don't want immigration reform i don't care what marco rubio or karl rove says or anybody at the top of national politics i'm addressing my constituents and trying to get re-elected in my district. >> that's the point chuck was making. these congressmen and women are looking at their home plate and they're saying okay, who's at home with me. that's their comfort zone. as long as their district is 9 % white or 75% white and is against, you know, amnesty or any form of immigration re form that speaks or looks like amnesty they're going to stay on that home plate, not move off of that. not this effort to try to reach
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consensus to build a broader message point on this immigration within the party. they're looking at this differently than the rest of us are looking saying we need -- the country needs this to move forward. they're like i'm going to get re-elected in a year so what do i care. that i think for the party is ultimately going to be a problem. i see two sorts hanging over the party's head going into the next election, immigration and voting rights act. talk about turnout in 2012, you can see a reversal on those two issues alone as a galvanizing point -- >> to drive up african-american and latino votes next year and white women responding as well because they look at that as not just the politics of it, but the social impact of those two issues on immigrant communities and that is a motivator for them. a lot of variables to take into consideration beyond your district. >> chuck todd, another big story we're covering. new details on what happened inside the cockpit of asiana flight 214 moments before it crashed on to that runway in san
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francisco. tom costello has been covering this story for us. he is live in san francisco. tom, good morning. >> hi, guys. good morning to you. this is all coming down to speed and to lining up properly on the right runway on runway 28 left. one of the pilots has now told investigators that they were struggling to line up properly on the right runway and he says they didn't notice that their speed had fallen. the wreckage of asiana flight 214 still sits on runway 28 left at sfo. passengers and crews on arriving and departing flights get an up close look at the disaster including passengers on other asiana flights. we now know the pilot was halfway through his 777 certification process with an instructor captain in the co-pilot's seat. that instructor told investigators the plane at first was coming in too high and not properly lined up for landing. >> the instructor captain stated that they were trying to make
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corrections during that portion of the flight between 500 feet and 200 feet to make some lateral corrections and also because they knew that they were low on the glide slope. >> reporter: the question, did the crew become distracted trying to get lined up on the runway. first too high and then too low. the instructor says when they noticed the auto throttles were not maintaining a minimum speed, it was too late. they crashed seconds later. we've also learned that two flight attendants who were in the rear of the plane were ej t ejected on impact, both survived though injured. meanwhile, these photos have got airline safety experts stunned. passengers who grabbed their luggage, purses, carry-ons, even duty-free shopping before leaving even though the plane was on fire. everyone in danger. flight atent dants say it could have been a deadly mistake. >> leave all bags behind. you're going to keep other people from getting off a burning aircraft, harm a slide and be off balance when you get to the bottom and put yourself
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in jeopardy of breaking a limb. >> because this was a foreign crew investigators did not have the legal authority to issue drug or alcohol tests on them. so that did not occur. one point of clarification here, when we talked about the auto throttles not holding the minimum speed, there is some discussion now about whether that was because of operator error. did the crew understand how the auto throttles system worked on this plane. it differs from plane to plane, boeing to boeing plane. was it operator error or a mechanical error. that will be something the ntsb will be looking at as well. back to you. >> tom, as we continue to marvel at those pictures you showed in the piece of people carrying their duty-free items i think we marvel at an even greater way looking at these pictures again, that only two people died. what can you tell us about the safety of the aircraft? i think there's an assumption if you're in a plane crash, frankly it's over, but some 300 people lived through this one. what was specific to this plane or specific to this day and age of safety that made that
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possible? >> yeah. if you go back and look at the last 15, 20 years of aviation in this country, in the united states, we have remarkable track record of safety. even consider the crashes that have occurred here. on this 777 crash the plane was only six years old. all but two got out alive. this plane is one of the best manufactured aircraft in the world. the interior fabrics are designed to provide people more time. they're flame resistant. provide people more time to get out. they believe everybody got out in 90 seconds. that's astonishing. look at the toronto crash in 2005, very similar situation where the entire plane burned up on landing. everybody got out alive also. same thing. we had in jamaica a crash landing i think in 2008, everybody got out alive. even though the plane was broken. there have been multiple instances of this. miracle on the hudson. everybody got out alive. these planes today are really built incredibly well. they're very robust and designed
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to give people that time to get out. of course, you know, this would have been probably a very different story if this plane had crashed on takeoff with a full load of fuel on board. as it was it came in with not a whole lot of fuel thankfully and we believe that the fire itself came from what fuel was left in the center fuel tank. >> tom costello all over this story in san francisco, good to talk to you. thanks so much. chuck, stick around as well. self-inflicted wounds, comedian aisha taylor joins us to talk about her book, why she's willing to publicly chronicle the most embarrassing funny moments of her life. it's been five years since steve jobs launched the app store. up next -- >> look at him. >> the tech revolution with major league baseball's bob bowman, dashing this morning, i might say. he helped develop one of the most popular sports apps in the world. you're watching "morning joe," brewed by starbucks.
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jo you're a developer and you just spent two weeks or maybe a little longer writing this amazing app and what is your dream? your dream is to get it in front of every iphone user and hopefully they love it and buy it. right? that's not possible today. developers don't -- most developers don't have those kinds of resources. even the big developers would have a hard time getting their app in front of every iphone user. we're going to solve that problem for every developer, big to small. and the way we're going to do it, is what we call the app store. >> that was steve jobs in 2008, introducing the app store to the world. more than 50 billion app downloads later, apple celebrating the fifth anniversary of its app store. with us now president and ceo of major league baseball advanced media, digital arm of mlb, mr.
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bob bowman. >> how are you all doing? >> brian shactman joining us as well. you were talking about steve jobs, we'll talk about the app in a minute in major league baseball, as we have a little distance from his death now, put him in the perspective in terms of ceos in history. >> certainly the best of my lifetime. no offense to jack welch who is the standard bearer but some terms of someone who changed the way we do everything it's steve jobs. he changed -- it's not a product. it's our life. it's how we do it. maybe we can argue it's not great that your kids never look at you in the eye. >> that's on the parent though. >> or your husbands. >> take it away? >> i can tell you you got young kids. talk to barnicle and me? take it away. >> easier with a 4-year-old. i'll admit that. >> until we have like the parent app you can talk to your kids through your own app -- that's what we need. >> skype from the next room. >> text from the next room. god forbid we talk to our kids. >> please come down for dinner
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if it's convenient for you. i made you dinner, clean up -- >> go into his outlook calendar and schedule a dinner. >> the cloud in our house. time for dinner. emily, please come. bring your rotten brother. >> oh. >> we're rotting at our core, aren't we? how is this app store five years on now, what has it meant to you and major league baseball? >> for us it's what steve jobs said, the best way to reach our fans. our game is a game with 15 new movies every day. you can't figure out what the end is. sometimes you a great walk-off or like the other day with the orioles a great defensive play. if you want to reach your fans every minute of every day you have to be on a device people carry every minute of every day. we frankly carry it probably too much even at night. the app store gave it organization. when we launched in '08 it was 800 apps now there's 900,000, probably a million apps there. it is the single best way to organize and be on a phone and be in front of everybody, not
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everybody downloads it, we've had 21 million downloads, haven't had everybody download it, but to get that in front of everybody in an organized way, revolutionized the iphone. the iphone launched a little bit before the app store did and they sold none really. now they've sold 350 million of these things and it was all about the app store. >> why do you have three variations? >> this is the first one that launched. just called an iphone. didn't have a number or anything. poor guy. little orphan here. the 3 and the 4, what it 3 and 4 looked like and now the 5, the thinnest one. those are the three versions. they haven't really changed that much. gotten faster, the cameras have gotten better. this is the first phone that really did video. all -- a lot of phones had cameras, blackberry had a camera in '06, this came out in '07. i think [ inaudible ] may have had it earlier. this had video. for us being able to play video if you're trying to deliver baseball or any live event or sports, video is key.
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sorry? >> i don't know -- are you -- i know these guys are huge baseball fans. i'm not sure if you are. talk about video, what is -- how many thousand video clips a day do you guys produce? >> we produce roughly if you think about it proeshgs deuce 20 for each game, so that's 20 times 15, that's 300. >> every single day. >> but then we produce another 300 of just around ancillary program or shoulder programming. we produce about a thousand video clips a day we put in front of people. we have 7 million views of video alone. >> what i wanted to ask, everyone sees the surface of it and i use the app all the time because i'm a red sox fan and live out of state, what's next? i mean you talk about five years and the development of apps but in terms of delivery of service with those videos, is it speed? is it three dimensionality? what can we expect we don't know about now? >> i think it's going to be a number of things. one, it will be speed. for instance, if you're the at the ballpark, you want to see the highlight in five seconds. don't want to wait 30 seconds. capture, produce it and get it
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to your ipad or iphone or android phone and see it right away. second of all, i think it will be push notifications so you'll see it more easily. your phone is sitting in your pocket, you might want to be reminded by the way, you know, or teased to hit a dinger last night and you want to get a reminder it's there or a little reminder he's at-bat and if he gets one more home run he's at 30 for the season or whatever. i think it's going to be much more push notification and sort of what goes on in the background of your app. your app will now update automatically and that means not just the software update we may do but the content we may do. i think that is going to happen. neck togeth technology will not be a device, it's going to be our life. >> bob, yasiel puig's campaign manager is in washington, d.c., he has a question. >> i was listening. >> i was listening to mr. todd as i do every morning. >> right, you're just creating the drama, freddie freeman, poor guy, thinks he's in first. you'll announce puig will win.
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>> nice to see you, good morning, chuck. the braves have launched a great campaign and freddie freeman is an all-star in everyone's mind and he deserves it as much as puig. puig is batting .400. inject the notion he shouldn't be there because he's sort of new. the 2013 all-star game, not the lifetime achievement award. >> right. >> so i think that, you know, my own view is he's going to run a good campaign. he deserves it. freddie freeman what a year and give the braves all the credit in the world. >> i was going to say, bob, i'm impressed they did that whole -- teamed up with the blue jays. >> right. >> and they did it, they sort of somebody over there figured it out first and said we're going to get canada behind freddie freeman and trade and help toronto try to get their player. i want to ask you, a larger question here, you know, maybe i'm being biased because i love baseball and but i love football too, and i feel you have understood social media in a way that sort of belies baseball for the longest time had the
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reputation you were technologically a little behind when it came to sort of modernizing with the fan and all of a sudden i feel like last four or five years you guys have really done something with social media, better than the other three major sports. is it just something unique about baseball? >> certainly unique about baseball. we play every day and our fans are passionate. whether you look at these three people who are all huge fans, yankees and red sox fans and hopefully they will be battling it for the rest of the season among the other teams in the al east, so there's something unique about the game and something unique about our fans. you move, you stay a fan of the team you grew up with. you don't switch allegiances. these guys are still red sox fans even though they might live somewhere else. i think that's unique. in terms of social media we take a weakness, chuck to your question, and make it a strength. that's what you try to do it in business and life. we were not as good as we needed to be in social media. we hired 25 people all under the age of 25 and social media is a way of life for them and now we are very active in it. the clubs have been great. the fans have been great. and people respond to it.
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they're very passionate. we're not worried about the economics of social media. it is that, social media. not a business plan. we have a business plan elsewhere. social media is a way to engage people. >> can i ask you -- >> go ahead. >> my first job out of college was doing pr for the haas family and the oakland a's during the possibility of a player strike and i wonder you haven't said anything about the players yet, but what role do they play in terms of people following them on twitter? obviously you can follow a player. but your videos are driven by the play of the day. are some of them better partners than others? >> some people are very active in social media and some people are not. baseball players, first of all, they are our content. it's good you mention they are the people in the field. these are in my opinion the best people in the world. >> they are your characters and drama. >> the game itself was set up for drama but in the end it's a golfer, not the whole that makes the drama. the baseball players. that's a fair point. and our players play every day so it's a full-time job.
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the other athletes aren't. they don't have as much downtime. they play until 12:00, 1:00, they get home and are tired and get back to the ballpark and do it again. we have some players younger typically, very active on social media, have a huge following and other players less so, maybe a little older. certainly the younger players coming up, my nephew plays in the mets organization, he made me get an instagram account, snap chat and all these other things. >> snap chat. >> whoa. >> bob, bob. >> get off snap chat. get off snap chat. >> don't know what goes on here at msnbc but -- >> don't do that. >> get off the snap chat. >> good advice there. >> save this interview. >> oh, my gosh. >> we are in the ditch. we are -- >> sort of started there today. >> so, finally the most important question, at what point in the second half does the red sox collapse begin? >> oh, please. >> is it -- >> want to do the reading again. >> mid-august, late august. >> and these upstart yankees, bunch of scrappy kids you never
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heard of make their charge up the standings, capture america's heart. >> every team in the al east has a shot. toronto has a great shot. anything can happen. that's the beauty of baseball. we'll probably have 30 teams eligible by september 1st. stay tuned. get the app. >> and half price today. >> is it? >> today only. $5 for a fifth year anniversary. >> wow. >> and he's mentioned it several times here this morning, the magic of the game, all wrapped up and they play it every day. every day. >> and mike barnicle sits in front of his ipad every day. >> every day. >> and watches out of town baseball games on your app. >> he needs to buy more stuff on that app. need to buyersies and hats. >> i just bought four hats yesterday. >> on-line? >> on-line. >> he's not kidding. bob bowman, congrats on the fifth anniversary. we'll continue the conversation on-line, use the #mojo to tweet in your questions for bob and watch that discussion today
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afternoonmojo.msnbc.com. chuck todd, keep voting and we'll get puig there. up next the controversial remedy more parents are turning to help their kids battle illness. dr. nancy snyderman reports on the rise of medical marijuana for children. >> i'll try that before junior gets it. mine was earned in djibouti, africa. 2004. vietnam in 1972. [ all ] fort benning, georgia in 1999. [ male announcer ] usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commitment to serve military members, veterans, and their families is without equal. begin your legacy, get an auto insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve.
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[ agent smith ] i've found software that intrigues me. it appears it's an agent of good. ♪ [ agent smith ] ge software connects patients to nurses to the right machines while dramatically reducing waiting time. [ telephone ringing ] now a waiting room is just a room. [ static warbles ]
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welcome back to "morning joe." did you know children in more than a dozen states are now able to access medical marijuana with a prescription to treat a range of illnesses. parents swear by the treatment but some doctors are expressing their concerns. dr. nancy snyderman has more on the story. >> reporter: when zaki was 6 months old he was diagnosed with a form of epilepsy causing life threatening seizures. >> he was having 60 to 250 seizures a year. >> reporter: after ten years and 17 medications his mother heather made a tough decision, to give her son marijuana. >> despite the stigma associated with cannibis, we really owed it to him to give it a try. >> reporter: the first night she gave him a liquid form of medical marijuana, she says the
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change was immediate and lasting. >> the seizure activity was down. he started pumping his legs on the swing which is something you -- he was 9 years old and you teach your children that from the time they're 3 and he could never get it. >> it's really good medicine. >> reporter: 17 states including colorado where he lives, kids are able to get medical marijuana by prescription to treat autism to cancer to seizures. because growers can breed the plant with low levels of the substance thc experts say the kids are getting just the medicinal benefits and not the high. some critics say marijuana used therapeutically could be a gateway to other drugs. the american academy of pediatrics is opposed to marijuana because it has not been clinically tested nor approved by the fda. >> using marijuana as a medication is jumping the gun because we don't know what the side effects and long-term consequences of marijuana are on
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particularly children. >> we spoke to a mom whose child suffered from seizure disorders and has tried everything and marijuana works. >> i worry we just don't know enough about it. a couple of generations ago, people were recommending tobacco even physicians, as a good method of relaxation or to relieve stress. it seems unbelievable now. >> reporter: but heather says she has all the proof she needs. >> in medical marijuana is definitely saving his life. it's saving his life and giving him a better quality of life. >> dr. nancy snyderman reporting. still ahead, actress and comedian aisha a taylor describes heartwarming tales of epic humiliation. up next, former senator byron dorgan joins the table. what inspired this new political thriller when "morning joe" comes right back. ♪
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[ agent smith ] i've found software that intrigues me. it appears it's an agent of good. ♪ [ agent smith ] ge software connects patients to nurses to the right machines while dramatically reducing waiting time. [ telephone ringing ] now a waiting room is just a room. [ static warbles ] [ telephone ringing ] i'to guard their manhood withoom trnew depend shields and guards. the discreet protection that's just for guys. now, it's your turn. get my training tips at guardyourmanhood.com
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welcome back to "morning joe." here with us former democratic senator from the state of north dakota the co-author of the novel "gridlock." good to see you. >> great to be with you. >> talk about the book in a second. you and mike were catching up about the way it used to to be in washington. a lot of romanticizing of what washington used to be like and not like now. how much of that is true and a rosy vision of the past both parties or at least the leaders of both parties got along, knew each other personally and did business better than today. >> people have been fighting in the political system for a couple hundred years in this country. the culture has changed in
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congress. i showed up 30 years ago now, 32 years, tip o'neill was speaker, the republican leader was bob michael, terrific guy. they liked each other a lot. when they saw a deedline, the decision was we're going to meet that deadline, how are we going to do it. people were willing to compromise. it wasn't a four-letter word or awful to compromise with somebody. so things have changed dramatically not for the better obviously. congress isn't working well. >> was that part of the reason you decided not to seek re-election? >> if you're nourished by accomplishment you're starving up there. they're not accomplishing anything. so i came to an intersection where the next decision is seven years. run for re-election this year and serve six more, a seven-year commitment. after 30 i wanted to do other things, write. i'm teaching at georgetown. i'm consulting at a law firm. doing a lot of things. boards of directors and enjoying myself. i watch you in the mornings while i exercise and enjoy the
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show. >> and still enjoy yourself. >> i really do, yeah. >> talk about the book "gridlock" based on an attack on our electrical grid here in the united states. what inspired the story for you? >> you know, actually, it was a "wall street journal" article some years ago in which they wrote a news article about the conjecture about china or russia might have put a virus into our electric grid system not for the purpose of bringing down our economy now but if ever in an adverse sairry situation you would have that capability. the fact is timely, the fbi has just sent notices to certain folks, homeland security sent notices to power providers saying that middle eastern hackers have been looking at trying to find a way to deal with something like this. secretary of defense, former secretary panetta talked about the next pearl harbor being a cyber attack. think for a moment, about seven years ago, the national science foundation did a big study and then it was classified and shut
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down for seven years, just released and they talked about a cyber attack potentially shutting down electricity across this country for a day a week, a month, or more which could ruin the economy. i mean, so you think about electricity, water, transportation, the kinds of things that can happen and this could be a war without guns. a cyber war. >> given the fact that we live in this truly open society, the ease with which this could happen, access. >> absolutely. >> to instruments of power, water, electricity as you said, is somewhat frightening. >> it is. that's why, you know, there is a new vulnerability here and i think most of us want to ignore it a bit. we have to get serious about it. this could bring down an entire economy. this book is a thriller about a virus the russians created. stolen by the iranians and in conjunction with venezuela put into the american electric grid system by a hacker in amsterdam, a crazy hacker. away we go. this causes very substantial chaos in our country. >> that's not a thriller.
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that's a news story. >> let's hope not. but, you know, there needs to be early warning to say this can happen in this country and i think this book is a great book obviously, a fascinating book, good read, but also something fairly serious about a threat that exists in our country. >> the book is "gridlock" a novel out in stores now. buy it on-line as well. senator byron dorgan. congratulations on the book. >> thanks so much. >> coming up next, aaisha taylor is taking a reboot in the classic show "whose line is it anyway" and talk about that and her new book in a moment. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. oh, he's a fighter alright. since aflac is helping with his expenses while he can't work, he can focus on his recovery. he doesn't have to worry so much about his mortgage, groceries, or even gas bills. kick! kick... feel it! feel it! feel it! nice work! ♪
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here with us now, the co-host of "the talk." everyone's laughing, reading the book. can i get through the intro? everyone's reading separate portions of the book laughing outloud. eye esha tyler out with a new book. great to have you here. >> thanks for having me. from kind of heavy duty big tone to my little book but thank you for having me on. >> there couldn't be a better advertisement. people laughing through the introducti introduction.
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>> yes, thank you. >> this is what made me laugh first. the time i puked all over the car. and a boy i liked in broad daylight. >> because is there something more awesome about puking in this car in broad daylight. >>cy feel like there's a boldness to it, i'm making a real statement. puking in the car at night, maybe it was a homeless guy that walked by. 9:00 in the morning, what is happening in her life? >> was that nausea induced? >> the condensed story, i always like to go big. when you have a crush in high school, just birds are falling out of the sky. the worrell hld has stopped. everybody in my school knew i liked this boy. pen pals in prison were like, you need to lay off the crush. he didn't like me back and then he did. and it freaked me out so much -- >> because he was a high school boy. >> it was me or cheese or skating, one of the three. we went out on this date.
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i was noips ervous so i got a l drunk. i thought it would be a really great idea to eat a hot falafal with a hangover. >> america needs to hear the story about the time youtweetin. >> all of america. i think that we are in an age now where every single thing that you say is just enshrined, is chiseled in digital stone forever. the way that people just fling tweets into the universe. we're not going to talk photos of their physical parts, just basic tweets. read it aloud to yourself. maybe read it aloud to your spouse or children or neighbor. decide whether you'd like to have that flung back in your face in seven months when you're running for office. every tweet, just think, if i was running for office, how would this sound. >> or if i had kids, would they want to google this about me. >> would they want to see'
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picture of my shorts? you know what i mean, maybe not. i say in that book that the internet is forever. no matter whether you deleted it, when cockroaches are running this planet and they log on to the internet, there will be a picture of your crotch. >> aren't you grateful in a lot ways we didn't have this when we were teenagers when we were puking on the car and the whole thing? because that history lives for the kids now it's forever. >> and we beat up on young people so much now about how irresponsible they are. we didn't have anybody memorializing all the mistakes we made. we were able to just kind of develop in secret. you know, being young you're just an idiot with feet pretty much. we were able to bumble through it and become adults. nowadays, just every dumb move, i mean, god, justin bieber, right, just a bowl of dumb. just a bowl of dumb with a $100,000 car. >> i have to admit a certain affinity with your title "self-inflicted wounds."
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i know a little bit about self-inflicted won eed wounds. how did you get to the point where you saw those wounds as heart warming and you sort take away the humor? because would be one of the toughest things to do in that moment is realize the humor. i had some humorous moments i didn't quite find funny at the time. later on, you sort of look at it and you try to find that spot. how did you go about doing that and really coming to getting it down on paper? >> well, that's a great question. i think that we -- one great thing about our culture i think is that we love a comeback. we love someone who can look at their foibles and laugh at them. sometimes you have to because otherwise you're huddled in a dark corner. for me, i feel like i was really an outsider as a kid and all those moments, those painful moments were legitimately painful. but what they made me was mentally tough. when you're going through those
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experiences, sometimes it's difficult to see what they are, which is a learning experience. throughout my entire career, i've always tried to say, this hurts right now, but how is this going to make me a better artist, a better person, how is it going to help me grow. i think unfortunately because of the 24 hour news cycle and digital media our mistakes are so much larger than they ever were before. the key is to look at every situation and go, how can i grow from this and also what kind of awesome story can i tell my friends in the bar tonight over drinks? because everybody hates the guy that's like i killed in the office today. so laugh at yourself. grow from it. your scars are what make you tough. bone is always strongest where it's broken. >> i love that. very good. you're walking us through your typical day. you do "the talk" in the morning. then you come hope, you do your podcast. you do a little writing for the book. and now you've got "whose line
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is it anyway" coming back. >> drew's an old friend of mine. an incredibly large set of shoes to fill. hi, drew. >> you can say that as a friend. >> he's amazing. this is a beloved brand people have known for years. it's been off the year for 12 years now. what's exciting about it is the old core team of improvisers are there but it's a little more modern, there's more games. it truly is made up on the spot. those guys don't know what they're doing till the minute it comes out of my mouth. i watched wayne get a suggestion for a song and a style and he's making up -- he's doing nicki minaj and her physicality and her voice and he's making a song that rhymes about i don't know pot pie. you're just looking, your mouth is hanging open. these guys are incredible. for me, taking over for drew, it's an honor. i, you know, this is something that is something you watch with your kids. it's something that everybody loves. a lot people watching it now
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never even saw its first incarnation in the states, they saw it on youtube. it's summertime, it's a good time to laugh. >> you are a very busy woman obviously. >> i am the black female ryan seacre seacre seacrest. i have 32 jobs. >> the book is "self-inflicted wounds." >> thank you for having me. >> coming up next, eliot spitzer's bid to get back into politics. the deadline he's facing. is he going to get those signatures by tomorrow? some question about that. we'll be right back. wi drive a ford fusion. who is healthier, you or your car? i would say my car. probably the car. cause as you get older you start breaking down. i love my car. i want to take care of it. i have a bad wheel - i must say. my car is running quite well. keep your car healthy with the works. $29.95 or less after $10 mail-in rebate
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we put together a segment for you folks. i hope you enjoy it. it's called a few minutes with the new york city comptroller eliot spitzer. take it away, eliot. >> huge, enormous. massive. nuts. too big. it goes deeper than that. a stick is a rhinoceros. i think dick is on to something. >> good morning. it's 8:00 here on the east coast, 5:00 a.m. as you wake up out west. back on set, mike barnacle, michael steele, nicole wallace and harold ford jr. eliot spitzer on this program. took some tough questions from
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joe and mika and mark halperin. how do you think he did? >> look, it felt like a very genuine moment. i think we all know doesn't happen very often in politics. he i think responded to mika's request to give an answer that wasn't scripted, that wasn't rehearsed. when he answered the question about what had changed, he talked about pain and all the pain he'd endured. he got emotional. i think it was a moment for a pundit to recognize her limitations and sit quietly and watch the journalist do the job so i had the benefit of sitting and watching everybody. i thought everybody did a great job. i thought mika and joe and mark halperin did an excellent job with a very uncomfortable line of questioning and i thought eliot spitzer for his part delivered unrehearsed real honest frank answers. that i hadn't seen him give before. >> harold, what's your sense as a new yorker of this city's willingness, whether it be for
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anthony weiner or eliot spitzer to move past some of that stuff in their personal lives? >> i think voters are very forgiving. you have people here who understand it's second lives and second chances are part of everything in life including business and personal affairs. it's curious as you watch both of these candidates when you talk about the body of work outside of their mistakes which is what you want people to look at. you wonder if some of his investigations and things he's done in the past, if he's willing to forgive others for what he believes their mistakes may have been. and anthony's side, you listen to the pain, what he's gone through, whether or not he made the decision not to tell the truth about, when he was confronted with -- i think his system had been hacked and i think he may have misrepresented about that, whether he learned from that. eliot had the best answer at the end of the day. he said voters will make the
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decision. i think they have either right to run. i hope ultimately these races, both the mayors race and comptroller's race, boils down to who has the best set of ideas to advance the city. >> he's got to get himself on the ballot. he's got to get about 4,000 signatures by tomorrow. apparently he's having a little trouble doing that. all the candidates have till tomorrow. it's 3,750 signatures to be exact. spitzer said he hopes to collect more than 7,000 signatures but that may be easier said than done. according to "the new york times" this morning after a few hours at union square the campaign ended up with more complaints from volunteers about the heat than they did signatures from potential voters. spitzer's democratic rivals say they plan to scrutinize every single signature he gets. manhattan borough president scott stringer who's running against spitzer has collected more than 100,000 signatures according to his campaign manager. here's former governor on "morning joe" yesterday on why
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he deserves a second chance. >> i have spent nine years reflecting, thinking, apologizing. i'm ready to ask for forgiveness. it's not easy. i'm ready to ask. i failed. i had flaws. made horrific judgments. was unfaithful to my family, to the electorate. that's why i resigned. what i did was not on wrong but was a consequence of hubris and of failure of judgment and self-indulgence. >> how are you different than you were five, six years ago? what has changed personally? >> a lot of pain. >> on who you are? >> a lot of pain. >> that's it? >> yeah, yeah go three that pain, you change. >> you don't have to like elliott speliot spitzer or believe those tears were real to admit he did sit here and take some really tough questions. anthony weiner's done the same thing. mark sanford did the same thing. which is to say, each got to take this head on and answer
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these questions till it passes and then i can get on to the issues. that was sort of the first round i think for spitzer taking that fire. >> what's the over/under on how much he contributes? >> i think it's substantial. >> pretty big. >> liquidating some assets right now to make the cash available. for what it's worth, "the new york post" has moved on, no spitzer on the first page. important coverage of miss usa and why she can't get a date in new york. >> you're kidding? >> more on that coming up. let's turn to more serious news. we've got new details into what happened inside the cockpit of asiana flight 214. federal investigators say the pilots thought they set the plane's auto throttle when they came in for landing. nbc's tom costello reports. >> reporter: new pictures of the crash scene in san francisco. the top priority for investigators has been to interview all four pilots who were on board flight 214
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including the veteran captain who was new to the 777 at the controls saturday. the teaching captain told investigators he realized at 200 feet they were coming in too slow and too low. >> he recognized that the auto throttles were not maintaining speed and he established a go around attitude. he went to push the throttles forward but he stated that the pilot had already -- the other pilot had already pushed the throttles forward. >> reporter: investigators are not alarmed that a veteran captain was making his first landing attempt at fso in a 777. >> no one's going to walk into ray cockpit with 100 landings under their belt. they've got to get experience. we have to figure out how that happens. >> reporter: retired united captain ross amer teaches new pilots if their approach isn't perfect, abort the landing attempt. >> decisive. be decisive. if you think you're too high or too slow, do something immediately. >> reporter: the president and ceo of asiana arrived to a media frenzy in san francisco, promising full cooperation with
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the investigation. meanwhile, the only crew member to speak to korean media, a flight attendant. she worked frantically to free passengers and other crew members trapped inside the plane. >> translator: actually, i was not thinking but acting. as soon as i heard emergency escape, i conducted the evacuation. >> reporter: two teenage girls from china died on saturday. one of them possibly hit by an arriving emergency vehicle. of the more than 180 passengers injured, 26 remain hospitalized, 6 in critical condition, including one child. a tae kwon do team returning from korea described the crash and aftermath. >> when i came down the chute, i looked over at the wing and i could still see fuel dropping from the wing. >> reporter: meanwhile, questions about why some passengers grabbed their luggage, purse, carry-ons, even duty free shopping before escaping the burning plane. then the urgent phone calls and text messages to loved ones. >> it's a life and death
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situation. for you to stop and get your bag as opposed to get off the aircraft and think about all the other people who are coming behind you. >> you were just saying you look at that plane. it's incredible only two peep died. it's terrible that only two people died. but the fact that only two died out of more than 300. >> to think about how far airline safety has come. it's stunning that you can have a landing like that and an emergency like that and, you know, sadly two people lost their lives. >> those pilots did probably -- allegedly did a lot of things wrong. you look at the one woman who had a broken tailbone and was carrying people on her back. and refused to get off the plane till everyone else was off. just incredible. there's some other news back here, you know, boston-style news. >> yeah, go ahead. >> this is mike barnicle's area of expertise. when two gangsters come face-to-face in a courtroom, you can expect things to get a
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little heated. yesterday, kevin weeks, a former partner of james whitey bulger, took the stand and testified against his former mentor. weeks was accused of cutting a deal with prosecutors so he would serve just five years in prison. he was asked if he felt any remorse for his role in the five killings it mike will be mr. weeks. i will be mr. bulger. >> a tale of a loser versus a sociopath. weeks is the loser. bulger is the sociopath. >> which one are you? >> i'm weeks, the loser. >> i'm the sociopath. >> this is from the transcript yesterday in court. >> it's so fun when joe and mika aren't here. >> we do role playing. why not. okay. you're first. >> five people are dead. yeah, it bothers me. we killed people that were rats and i had the two biggest rats right next to me. >> you suck. >> "f" you, okay.
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>> "f" you too. >> what do you wanna do? >> and scene. >> yeah! >> they're shaking in they boots down on broadway. >> we should take that off broadway. yes, the first time bulger and weeks had spoken to each other in 16 years. >> maybe. >> so what's the nature of that relationship right there? >> uh -- >> going back through the years? >> kevin weeks is a neighborhood kid who used to work as a bouncer in a bar in south boston that bulger used to frequent. kevin was good with his fists. whitey recognized someone who could perhaps be useful to him in shaking down others in the neighborhood, drug dealers and everything like that. and the employment of kevin weeks began in the early 1980s. and eventually kevin was along for the ride when bulger and his partner, principal partner, steve flemmi, began killing
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people in front of weeks. not that he hadn't killed people before. kevin was fully incorporated into the game. and it was sort of a father/son relationship. for the, many years. until after bulger split. because kevin weeks was in contact with jim bulger when whitey bulger was on the lam for several years, until he lost track of him. >> put it in perspective, who played weeks in "departed"? >> that was a combination. nicholson played bulger. >> but it wasn't damon or dicaprio, was it? >> that was a combination. those two roles were a melding of several other roles. >> in case you hadn't noticed, mike covered this case for years for "the boston globe." he's just not randomly familiar. >> whitey's braer was president of the massachusetts senate for years and refused for years.
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because i used to put in the paper that whitey bulger was nothing -- no drugs moved in south boston without whitey bulger and his brother would say no, you know, he does things but not drugs. he doesn't do drugs. which of course nothing could move including cocaine and heroin without his permission. bill bulger told me, no, i heard from higher authority from you that he doesn't do drugs. the fbi would tell bill bulger no, he's okay, he's not doing drugs. the fbi agent is in jail for life. >> wow, an incredible story. the true story. good acting. well done. >> well done, guys. >> there's more, we could do the whole transcript. >> i think we've done enough damage. >> just spread it out. >> last night, we got a little word from up in alaska, from former governor sarah palin who hinted she may be mulling a return to public office. this was a radio interview yesterday. governor palin said she is considering running next year for u.s. senate.
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right there in alaska. >> i've considered it because people have requested me considering it. but i'm still waiting to see what the lineup will be and hoping that there again there will be some new blood, new energy. not just kind of picking from the same old politicians in the state. >> race's next year, 2014. >> why did you point that out? >> i speak palin. >> she's been through enough. >> the democratic senator holds that seat. two prominent alaska republicans have announced their bids. treadwell and the previous senate nominee in 2010, joe miller. >> i just, i was trying to figure out listening to her, as i'm always trying to figure out, who the new buds are. is she a new bud? or is she saying people have requested her to run?
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but she'd prefer a new bud? it's unclear if she sees herself as part of the old guard or see herself as something new. i'm not sure how she sees her own process. >> i think she sees herself as that something new. >> a new bud. >> yeah, and that's generally been sarah's position in most political fights, whether it's within the party or externally. and so i think yeah, i mean, a lot of people have talked to her about it. she's looking down the road. not to say that sarah's running. i'm just saying positioning herself as maybe a senator from alaska to be on the national stage. >> hypothetically, say you're considering someone running as a republican in an important state that happens to lean blue at times, with you want her on the ballot in 2014 as a big voice?
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if she decides to run, she will be a huge voice in the party and a huge voice that the press will look to. >> it doesn't matter. it doesn't matter. whether she's on the ballot or off the ballot. in any form, is obviously going to bleed across the spectrum. that piece of it is largely irrelevant. the press will make her irrelevant to any conversation the minute she says something. if you're running for the u.s. senate in your home state or you're running for congress or even for governor -- >> hypothetically. >> hypothetically. >> the difference is -- i think the difference, though, if she's running, she will be asked to weigh in on all the policy debates that a serious candidate is going to have to. if you're running for office in a state, you're going to have to weigh in on how you wow vould v on the immigration bill. the challenge would be whether she's talking and speaking out as a commentator, as a reality
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tv host, or if she runs for president, the kinds of questions she'd have to field i think would be intertwined with the serious policy debates. >> it's one thing if she's running her own cooking show and being asked about what's going on in the middle east versus being a candidate for the united states senate and being asked. if she's running her own cooking show and comments on that, yeah, i can see that bleed out to other campaigns. if she's running for office, that's her view on that issue. >> the trick question would be if someone asked her where the middle eat was. >> on her cooking show. >> if she could figure out. >> if it was visible from parts of her property. >> she's got a following and it has endured. >> still ahead on "morning joe," how personal finance fits into the larger economic puzzle.
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i have spent nine years reflecting, apologizing. i am ready to ask for
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forgiveness. >> you broke the law on a number of levels. when it was revealed there were different things that were happening in your life that you weren't telling people about. what i want to know is what drove that poor judgment and why should we feel that wouldn't happen again? >> i failed. i had flaws. made horrific judgments. was unfaithful to my family. to the electorate. that's why i resigned. i stood up and i said, i'm holding myself accountable. it's the only right thing to do. >> what were the flaws that led you to break the law and break the public trust? >> what i did was not only wrong but was a consequence of hubris and a failure of judgment and self-indulgence which is absolutely inexplicable and unjustifiable, improper. i would agree with most of mika's characterizations about it. all i can say to the public is
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look at the totality. look at what i stand for. make a judgment. i have trusted the public's judgment whether i was a low level assistant d.a. trying a misdemeanor case or a voter asking for -- a candidate asking for the votes of the public. i would trust the verdict of the public, yes or no. >> an elected official, governor of new york, comptroller new york, lying about his personal life, that's fine? >> i didn't say that's fine. you asked if it was disqualifying. it requires more time to parse out what that boundary is between the private and the public. people lie about their taxes, not having paid their taxes and all rest. i think that is disqualifying. >> but you lied about illegal activity. >> i lied about personal sexual activity, yes. and i did that. i'm not trying to diminish it. >> you weren't lying about an affair. you were lying about an illegal activity. >> okay, that's correct. >> you're saying that lying about illegal activity to you is not disqualifying?
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>> i will let the public make that determination. >> how were you different than you were five, six years ago? >> a lot of pain, a lot of pain. >> that's it? >> yeah. >> you go through that pain, you change. >> that was former new york governmenter eliot spitzer on "morni ining joe" yesterday. joining us now is spitzer's competition, manhattan borough president scott stringer. nicole wallace, michael steele and brian are still at the table as well. >> morning. >> that's not the first time you've seen the interview, is it? >> it's still painful to watch. >> why is it painful to watch? because i want to have a different conversation with new york voters. i want to talk about the fiscal challenges the city faces. i want to be the steward of a very important pension fund.
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it's the 14th largest in the world. we need a comptroller who will focus on the working people. the voters have to elect a controller they can trust and would has a real record fighting for them. >> when did you first get an inkling or hear about the potential candidacy of spitzer? >> you know the circus of the election in new york city. we felt we could get weiner in this case because he polled against me. we had heard that eliot was thinking possibly running for comptroller. people say, were you surprised he was coming in so late? on reflecting on this, when you have awe of his money, when you shun the campaign finance progap and spend $800 to try to get yourself on the ballot, it doesn't matter when he decided but we're ready to talk about the issues. >> he said in part in that interview among other things look at what i stand for.
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what to you stand for and what do you think he stands for? >> i stand for integrity, experience, leadership. as a member of the state legislature, i ended empty seat voting in albany. i had the basis of real reform. and then i became manhattan borough president. rooting out waste. exposing inefficiency of government. i've worked hard to make sure we have a diverse asset portfolio. i've worked collaboratively with many of the trustees i'll have to work with as comptroller. the job as comptroller doesn't sound important but it is. you have to have two distinct skill sets. the first is you must be able to work with the mayor. you have to issue bonds together. you have to work in a very cooperative way. at the same typime, you have toe
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fiercely independent. you have to challenge city hall. you have to understand you're f fiduciary of this pension fund. that's a big deal. >> you and quinn are strangely in similar positions. you're both running against men who have admittedly made grave personal errors but they are commanding a lot attention. not just national but locally. have you looked how she's handled her race against weiner? is there anything you've had to recalibrate to runverybody know his failings but people still have a lot of confidence. >> the question is, is he right for this position? this is not about being a sheriff, this is about being a steward. this is about getting things done. obviously, his governorship wasn't the most successful in the country. i don't think you -- i think you don't reward failure.
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i'm running because -- >> you think he's a failure? you think the personal failings -- >> i'm not doing the personal thing. that's between his god and his family -- >> in office, you think he'd make more enemies than friends? >> i just don't think that skill of dividing, step perment, of trying to steam roll people is what the job is. if you're going to change social policy, if you're going to fight for the people who lost their homes, we're going to get 60-some odd billion dollars of federal money. make sure the people in the communities get what they deserve. this is about -- not about me, myself and i, this is about helping people. >> let's set the sexual proclivities of others aside. i think the bottom line is who gives a rat's patootie about it. how are you going to reform the office? how will you see changing that office in the context of not
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just new york city but new york city's role globally? you talked about going into the markets for bonds and getting those bonding rated. that's a big piece of what a comptroller's responsibility are and how they position the city globally as well as locally fiscally. >> it's an excellent question. look, we have aa bond rating now. you have to work with the mayor. you have to speak to the stability of our financial plan. in terms of reform, we have five different pension funds. i've got to get the 58 trustees to work with me so we can lower the management and consulting fees. we spend $400 million in consulting fees when we should build out the bureau of asset management to bring people in house to make important decisions. i'm not running as a day trader.
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what i have to do is manage an office, budget. i need to engage a national search for chief investment officer. when people will say, i want to work with you, not on wall street -- because they're going to get bonuses -- they have to know i'm someone they can trust, i'm going to be able to elevate the office with respect. you have a young smart man or one who wants to contribute in government, they want to know the person they're working with is someone who has integrity, who's going to make their resume proud. i have to reimagine the office. my dad was a lawyer in the controller's office. kind of how i grew up. i remember going to that office. looks like a movie out of "mad men." the technology's a generation behind. it's out of another planet. we've got to reimagine the office to get it up and running so we can be competitive with the next mayor. when the mayor does the wrong
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thing, we have the technology and capability to go head to head. >> quick question, you know eliot spitzer from the legislature, do you like him? >> it's not about liking him. i don't want to be his friend. i don't want hip to confess to me. i don't want that drama. we're going to make this a very short run. i'm going to be out in the streets. we're going to be well financed. the people of new york city understand what's at stake. i'm ready to go. >> scott stringer, thanks very much. coming up, the deep impact of retirement and personal finance on the overall economy. (girl) what does that say?
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joining us now, the co-host of cnbc's "street signs." brian sullivan, with the red tie on today. and meredith whitney, author of "the fate of the states." one of the things that has been bothering me, actually, it hasn't been bothering me. one of the things i've been thinking about. does anybody save money anymore? i was actually in a physical bank the other day because the
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atm didn't work. does anybody save? >> no. i mean, some people save. but not enough people save. those who do save don't save enough. we know that about half of the country couldn't come up with $2,000 if they needed it. they're quote/unquote financially fragile. which is a huge problem. because if the roof starts to leak, if your transmission goes. you have basically no choice but to put it on a credit card. ed me ka expenses drive more people into bankruptcy than anything else. >> that's the disconnect, right, between new york or the northeast and the rest of the country. in the northeast, there seems to be -- the socioeconomic order is much different than indiana or illinois. we talk all the time about the retail investors not investing. if you're not saving, and then on top of that, what about investing in the marketplace. so if people aren't saving, what are they doing if they are
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making any more money? >> they're living paycheck to paycheck. those 401k enrollments have plateaued. they were going up. after automated people into 401ks. now people are not getting in as they should. >> i want to bring up a chart. i don't want to sort of disinfect this with all kinds of crazy data. consumer credit has soared in the last 30 years. we are borrowing so much money. by the way, the average home size has gone up 60% since 1973. the average car is now more than $31,000. we are saving but it's in our homes. we are spending more on housing. we are living in bigger homes. look at that consumer debt soaring. there's part the problems. incomes have remained stagnant
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for the middle class. home prices and car prices have gone up well above inflationary levels. we're just simply house and car poor. >> if you look at consumer credit, $2 trillion of consumer credit. so what people are doing is spending what they have. so you have two worlds in the united states. an inflationary world with medical costs and commodities and food. then you have a deflationary force which is home prices and wage growth. there's no wage growth. just to survive, people are spending what they have. that is what is so tragic about doing nothing. because we have to get americans back to work to enable them to save. >> do we not always have a strange collision of catch-22 and the fear factor? the catch-22 being i would say but i'm afraid to save because i don't know we i'm going to make next week because i get paid by the hour. and the fear factor is i still
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have a job but i'm afraid i'm going to lose my job because i've known many people who have lost their job. >> the job market has been volatile. so when you have high volatility, you're going to have a higher savings rate. low volatility would suggest you would spend more. you're spending more and saving less. it's counter to what's happened in the past. i really think it's survivability issue more than anything else. >> are either political parties doing or saying anything that would address what you're talking about? >> i think the only issue in america is job creation period. you're seeing a lot of basically hot air talk about -- >> from both sides. >> addressing the issue and nothing's been done. it's so tragic for the americans living in this country. the middle class and poor are getting a harder time to survive. and rich people are getting
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richer. so the tdivide i don't think hasser behas hasser has ever been this extreme. >> for all the people who haven't saved, in real terms, what do we expect to happen? >> social security will be there. it has to be there. that is the de facto savings rate for so many americans, along with their homes. to meredith's point, and the book and her calls i think are going to be very prescient down the road. i just got back from northern wisconsin. you talk to people up there who work in factories, they're making half what they made 20 years ago. the american consumer has a role to play. we have to make a decision. if we are not willing to pay up for american made goods, we're going to be caught in a cycle of cheap, wages are going to continue to fall, and no one's
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going to make anything. we have to decide what's important for neighbors. paying taxes or buy more goods from america that might raise wage inflation so people can make a living wage. we are the ones in charge, not the government. >> the government doesn't create jobs but the government can certainly suppress job creation. that's what i think it's done. you have regulatory issues that are really hampering down on businesses creating jobs. consumer consumption can only go so far. >> to brian's point, people need to take care of their own savings. the risk with all of that money that's flowing into people's hopes, those bigger and big hoe homes, is we will use them as atms. >> one thing that's truly depressing, that nothing is coming out of washington in term, of putting people to work. j-o-b is still the most important word in the english language. thank you very much. meredith's book is "fate of the
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states." up next, msnbc's lisa bloom brings us up to speed in the george zimmerman murder trial in florida. out there owning it. the ones getting involved and staying engaged. they're not afraid to question the path they're on. because the one question they never want to ask is "how did i end up here?" i started schwab for those people. people who want to take ownership of their investments, like they do in every other aspect of their lives.
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so the wound itself by the gap by the powder tattooing, in the face of contact of the coating indicates that this is consistent with mr. zimmerman's account, that he, that mr. martin, was over him, leaning forward, at the time he was shot. >> that was gunshot wound expert dr. vincent di maio testifying.
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joining us, lisa bloom. what's up with this trial? >> yesterday was the best day for the defense and that was the best witness for the defense because he said zimmerman's story is consistent with all the scientific and medical evidence. the prosecutor was very easy on him on cross examination in my opinion. let him get away with some stuff. but the way the jury heard it, very good day for the defense. >> how long is the defense going to be? >> they're supposed to finish today. george zimmerman will not be taking the stand. there were some late-night arguments till 10:00 p.m. when the judge said she had it and walked out on the defense attorney when he was still talking about whether some additional evidence should come in. the defense should probably finish. >> i'm fascinated by reasonable doubt. i used to think if there was any doubt, then that's reasonable doubt. can you give people a little clarity on that? >> not any doubt, reasonable doubt. what that means is the jury has to have an abiding conviction in their verdict. there's always going to be some doubt in life, right, you can never be 100% sure about
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anything. but they have to be confidence in their verdict. essentially that's the standard. >> my question is this animation, how is that playing, how has that kind of put a little moment into this trial at this point? >> right. that's one of the issue, that the judge has to decide, is with a defense expert who put together the defense story and has an animation showing george zimmerman on the bottom, trayvon martin on the top, beating him. sort of putting that altogether visually for the jury. whether that should come in or not. so the judge has to decide. >> what's the timetable? in terms of summations? >> if the defense finishes today, the prosecution can do a rebuttal case. the defense can do a surrebuttal case with witnesses. the judge will charge the jury and then closing arguments and the jury gets the case. >> are we talking within --
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>> within a couple of days. >> within a couple days. >> yeah, it could even be the weekend the jury is deliberating. they're sequestered so the judge wants to get this done. lisa, thank you. we'll be right back. tems," "and one of the most efficient trucking networks," "with safe, experienced drivers." "we work directly with manufacturers," "eliminating costly markups," "and buy directly from local farmers in every region of the country." "when you see our low prices, remember the wheels turning behind the scenes, delivering for millions of americans, everyday. "dedication: that's the real walmart" vietnam in 1972. [ all ] fort benning, georgia in 1999. [ male announcer ] usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commitment to serve military members,
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we don't look at motorcyclists as the most
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courteous. >> i do. >> even when they're cutting through and you knew if i went this way i'd kill them and they don't care? >> good point. >> look at this guy, the motorcycle, he drives up, picks up the cup, gives -- catches to the woman and gives it to her. she left her morning coffee on the back bumper. what does she do? whoa. she dumps it out. the reason why i know this wasn't staged, 'cause i watched the whole thing. it took him a while to catch up to her. and he drove right off. there's a good samaritan on a motorcycle for you. >> what are the mountains in the backdrop there? it's pretty. >> did it ever occur to anybody to just kind of pull over? >> apparently not. >> where would the fun be in that? the big story, the heat in
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the middle of the country. dallas at 101. very warm in the intermountain west. areas like boise getting to 100. eastern half of the country, thunderstorms, damaging winds possible, ohio valley into the northeast later on today. a hot steamy morning. any last rs mr. baldwin? do you mind grabbing my phone and opening the capital one purchase eraser? i need to redeem some venture miles before my demise. okay. it's easy to erase any recent travel expense i want. just pick that flight right there. mmm hmmm. give it a few taps, and...it's taken care of. this is pretty easy, and i see it works on hotels too. you bet. now if you like that, press the red button on top. ♪ how did he not see that coming? what's in your wallet?
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how did he not see that coming? help the gulf recover, andnt to learn from what happenedg goals: so we could be a better, safer energy company. i've been with bp for 24 years. i was part of the team that helped deliver on our commitments to the gulf - and i can tell you, safety is at the heart of everything we do. we've added cutting-edge safety equipment and technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, where experts watch over all our drilling activity, twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. safety is a vital part of bp's commitment to america - and to the nearly 250,000 people who work with us here. we invest more in the u.s. than anywhere else in the world. over fifty-five billion dollars here in the last five years -
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what judhave we learned too? >> i think scott stringer will have to get his knuckles dirty. >> i'm learned everyone on broadway is shaking in their shoes because of the power of your dramatic reading with willie. >> it was good stuff. >> say it again. >> you can't do it justice. >> just something in the method. barnicle's going method actor on us. >> aisha and the whole story to me was just exciting, it was
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just great. i wish her the best with the book. >> if it is too early, what time really is it? >> it's time for "morning joe." coming up next, it's chuck todd and "the daily rundown." it's wednesday, july 10th, 2013. this is "the daily rundown." it's day 22 of the george zimmerman trial in stanford, florida, where the defense team appears to be winding down their case. the jury could be taking this case as early as tomorrow. you're looking at live pictures where any moment judge deborah nelson is expected to issue decisions. one is whether to allow jurors to see that computer animation we were telling you about yesterday which apparently depict's zimmerman's version of events. the second is whether to allow jurors to see the 17-year-old martin's text messages that purportedly discuss fighting. e